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Tag Archives | perinatal depression

Is BDNF a Biomarker for Depression During Pregnancy and the Postpartum Period?

Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a growth factor which acts on neurons in both the central and peripheral nervous systems, promoting the survival of neurons and promoting the growth and differentiation of new neurons and synapses.  In the brain, it is most active in the hippocampus, cortex, and basal forebrain—areas important  to learning, memory, and […]

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Credit: Pregnant Woman from Wikimedia Commons

The 50-year Quest for Better Pregnancy Data

The following post was first published in OB/GYN News. Please see our OB/GYN News archives here. Publish date: November 1, 2016 By: Gerald G. Briggs, BPharm, FCCP, Christina Chambers, PhD, MPH, Lee S. Cohen, MD, & Gideon Koren, MD Editor’s note: As Ob.Gyn. News celebrates its 50th anniversary, we wanted to know how far the medical community has come in identifying and […]

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Study Links Conflict with Partner to Increased Vulnerability to Perinatal Depression

The Maternity Experiences Survey (MES) is a national survey of Canadian women’s experiences, perceptions, knowledge and practices before conception and during pregnancy, birth and the early months of parenthood. This is a project funded by the Public Health Agency of Canada’s Canadian Perinatal Surveillance System, with the goal of achieving a better understanding of the […]

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New Legislation to Support Maternal Mental Health

Some good news for women with perinatal mood and anxiety disorders… Today, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the Bringing Postpartum Depression Out of the Shadows Act  to provide federal grants to develop and maintain programs for screening and treatment of postpartum depression. This bill, introduced by Congresswoman Katherine Clark (D-Mass) and Congressman Ryan Costello […]

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Weekly Roundup for NOV 4 2016: Recent Publications in Women’s Mental Health

The first article on the list is one that relies on the Swedish medical registers to look neonatal outcomes in infants prenatally exposed to antidepressants.  While the study does not generate new things to worry about, it is one of the largest studies in this area and gives us more information on the prevalence of […]

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Postpartum Depression: Focus on Managing Comorbid Anxiety Symptoms

  Multiple studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of antidepressant medications for the treatment of postpartum depression (PPD).  Most of the these studies focused on the impact of these medications on depressive symptoms; however, it is clear that many, or maybe most, women with PPD also have significant anxiety symptoms.  Thus, we can hypothesize that medications […]

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When It Comes to Pregnancy, Bad Timing May Be a Risk Factor for Depression

In early studies designed to identify specific risk factors for postpartum depression, unplanned pregnancy was identified as a relatively weak predictor of postpartum depression.  But there are many different types of unplanned pregnancy. For example, an unplanned but desired pregnancy is distinct from an unplanned and unwanted pregnancy.  Or what about a pregnancy that is […]

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Credit: Depressed Mother from Wikimedia Commons

What Keeps Women with Perinatal Depression from Getting the Help They Need?

  The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recently released recommendations on Screening for Depression in Adults. The Task Force recommended that clinicians screen ALL ADULTS for depression and noted that screening in the primary care setting is beneficial. Echoing the recommendations made by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists last year, the  USPSTF […]

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Credit: Pregnant Woman from Wikimedia Commons

Interpersonal Therapy Effective for Moderately Severe Depression During Pregnancy

Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT) is a time-limited psychotherapy which is based on the theory that deficiencies or disruptions in interpersonal relationships play an important role in the emergence and persistence of depression.  The primary goals of IPT are to reduce symptom severity, improve interpersonal functioning, increase social support and decrease social isolation.  IPT has been demonstrated […]

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