There are lots of new articles to review — partly because I haven’t had a chance to pull together the “weekly” roundup for a while, but also because there continues to be a huge number of articles being published in the field of perinatal psychiatry.  Some of the most interesting articles on the list are included in the Festschrift (I had to look this one up: “a collection of writings published in honor of a scholar”) for Ian Brockington.  This is an amazing collection of articles on postpartum psychosis and other psychotic syndromes associated with childbearing, meticulously researched and richly detailed.  

There are also several very important articles on the effects of maternal depression on child outcomes in low- and middle-income countries (Herba et al, Gelaye et al), underscoring the importance of addressing the global burden of maternal depression.

But the article on the list that received the most attention is from Brown and colleagues on prenatal exposure to SSRIs and speech, scholastic, and motor disorders.  Despite the title of the article — and the scary sounding headlines in the media — this study raises questions but does not really change our approach to SSRIs and prengnancy.  You can read our summary of the study here; despite some limitations and methodologic issues, the findings suggest a small increase in risk of speech/language disorders in children with prenatal exposure to SSRIs but no association with scholastic or motor disorders.

Ruta Nonacs, MD PhD


Association of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Exposure During Pregnancy With Speech, Scholastic, and Motor Disorders in Offspring.

Brown AS, Gyllenberg D, Malm H, McKeague IW, Hinkka-Yli-Salomäki S, Artama M, Gissler M, Cheslack-Postava K, Weissman MM, Gingrich JA, Sourander A.

JAMA Psychiatry. 2016 Oct 12.


Neurodevelopmental Implications of Fetal Exposure to Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Untreated Maternal Depression: Weighing Relative Risks.

Cohen LS, Nonacs R.

JAMA Psychiatry. 2016 Oct 12.


The effects of paternal depression on child and adolescent outcomes: A systematic review.

Sweeney S, MacBeth A.

J Affect Disord. 2016 Nov 15;205:44-59. Review.


Epidemiology of maternal depression, risk factors, and child outcomes in low-income and middle-income countries.

Gelaye B, Rondon MB, Araya R, Williams MA.

Lancet Psychiatry. 2016 Oct;3(10):973-982. Review.


Maternal depression and mental health in early childhood: an examination of underlying mechanisms in low-income and middle-income countries.

Herba CM, Glover V, Ramchandani PG, Rondon MB.

Lancet Psychiatry. 2016 Oct;3(10):983-992.


Non-reproductive triggers of postpartum psychosis.

Brockington I.

Arch Womens Ment Health. 2016 Oct 8.


Late onset postpartum psychoses.

Brockington I.

Arch Womens Ment Health. 2016 Oct 6.


Recurrent episodes associated with childbearing: a matrix of associations.

Brockington I.

Arch Womens Ment Health. 2016 Oct 17.


Some unusual forms of early onset postpartum psychosis.

Brockington I.

Arch Womens Ment Health. 2016 Oct 16.


Runge psychoses.

Brockington I.

Arch Womens Ment Health. 2016 Oct 8.


Donkin psychosis.

Brockington I.

Arch Womens Ment Health. 2016 Oct 8.

Donkin psychoses are eclamptic psychoses without seizures.


Late onset postpartum psychoses.

Brockington I.

Arch Womens Ment Health. 2016 Oct 6.


Citation analysis of puerperal and menstrual psychosis.

Brockington I.

Arch Womens Ment Health. 2016 Oct 6.


Adolescent predictors of alcohol use in adulthood: A 22-year longitudinal study.

Lee JY, Brook JS, Nezia N, Brook DW.

Am J Addict. 2016 Oct;25(7):549-56.. Epub 2016 Sep 15.  Free Article


Women with bipolar disorder and pregnancy: factors influencing their decision-making

Dolman C, Jones IR, Howard LM.

Small Study: Twenty-one women with bipolar disorder from an NHS organisation were interviewed, and data were used from 50 women’s comments via the online forum of the UK’s national bipolar charity. The centrality of motherhood, social and economic contextual factors, stigma and fear were major themes. Within these themes, new findings included women considering an elective Caesarian section in an attempt to avoid the deleterious effects of a long labour and loss of sleep, or trying to avoid the risks of pregnancy altogether by means of adoption or surrogacy.


Identifying women at risk for postpartum anxiety: a prospective population-based study.

Dennis CL, Falah-Hassani K, Brown HK, Vigod SN.

Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2016 Sep 17. [Epub ahead of print]


Treating women with perinatal mood and anxiety disorders (PMADs) with a hybrid cognitive behavioural and art therapy treatment (CB-ART).

Sarid O, Cwikel J, Czamanski-Cohen J, Huss E.

Arch Womens Ment Health. 2016 Sep 19. [Epub ahead of print]

Overview of a combined, evaluated protocol, cognitive behavioural and art therapy treatment (CB-ART).


Association of estradiol with sleep apnea in depressed perimenopausal and postmenopausal women: a preliminary study.

Galvan T, Camuso J, Sullivan K, Kim S, White D, Redline S, Joffe H.

Menopause. 2016 Sep 19. [Epub ahead of print]


Antidepressant medication during pregnancy and epigenetic changes in umbilical cord blood: a systematic review.

Viuff AC, Pedersen LH, Kyng K, Staunstrup NH, Børglum A, Henriksen TB.

Clin Epigenetics. 2016 Sep 7;8(1):94. Review.  Free Article


Polycystic ovary syndrome and psychiatric disorders: Co-morbidity and heritability in a nationwide Swedish cohort.

Cesta CE, Månsson M, Palm C, Lichtenstein P, Iliadou AN, Landén M.

Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2016 Nov;73:196-203.