Mass General Hospital

Harvard Medical School

Welcome to the MGH Center for Women’s Mental Health

Welcome

Welcome to The Ammon-Pinizzotto Center for Women’s Mental Health at MGH. Our Center, established in 1989, has been renamed following the generous gift from Carol Ammon and Dr. Marie Pinizzotto. These resources will be used to realize the overarching mission of the Center.

This website provides a range of current information including discussion of new research findings in women’s mental health and how such investigations inform day-to-day clinical practice. Despite the growing number of studies being conducted in women’s health, the clinical implications of such work are frequently controversial, leaving patients with questions regarding the most appropriate path to follow. Providing these resources to patients and their doctors so that individual clinical decisions can be made in a thoughtful and collaborative fashion dovetails with the mission of our Center.

The National Pregnancy Registry for Psychiatric Medications:

All pregnant women ages 18-45 are eligible to enroll in the registry. We are currently seeking both controls and those being treated with atypical antipsychotics and/ or antidepressants.

This study will involve 3 brief phone interviews over an 8-month period. The National Pregnancy Registry for Psychiatric Medications is dedicated to evaluating the safety of psychiatric medications that may be taken by women during pregnancy to treat a wide range of mood, anxiety, or psychiatric disorders. The primary goal of this Registry is to determine the frequency of major malformations, such as heart defects, cleft lip, or neural tube defects, in infants exposed to atypical antipsychotics and antidepressants during pregnancy. For more information, please call 1-866-961-2388 or e-mail registry@womensmentalhealth.org.

Help make the future better for many other women like you.

The MGH Center for Women’s Mental Health

Perinatal and Reproductive Psychiatry Program

Simches Research Building

185 Cambridge St Suite 2200

Boston, MA 02114

 

To make an appointment:

Massachusetts General Hospital Clinical Program: (617) 724-7792

Location of appointments: 

Wang Ambulatory Care Center, Massachusetts General Hospital

15 Parkman St., Floor 8

Boston, MA 02114-3117 

Latest News from our Blog

  • Weekly Roundup for AUG 19 2016: Recent Publications in Women’s Mental Health

    August 19, 2016

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    This week brings a large scale study on the reproductive safety of the newer atypical antipsychotic medications from Huybrechts and colleagues.  To date, this is the largest sample of antipsychotic-exposed infants assessed, and the results look good, suggesting that the use of atypical antipsychotics during the first trimester of pregnancy does not seem to increase ...

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  • In Brief: Bedtime Stretching Exercise May Help Menopausal Symptoms

    August 18, 2016

    Photo by Christoph Lehmann https://www.flickr.com/photos/grooovy_easy/5255389744/in/photolist-91pfh1-5oVsER-pFpnRy-ec2MCd-gF9N97-5b3Vne-4NFhyn-8iQxd7-dUwWK-99SzT7-oEz9b9-6Bd2RD-64wPBn-bRpiQ6-6pQf1X-6CCqez-a7FBLH-9hhcsM-hhqhvC-Hx3Lu-w8y2T4-qpERyX-5FKSzJ-8MiyXg-2hvEdW-RBDAe-qxxAD4-4PRiP1-nE2Gaf-iGVY57-4VahiX-9DGHg9-r2EXfL-3hshNC-gGgjkR-buckND-jBwuQM-tQZcDc-qUzYP5-82899z-tyamDh-Hx9Ur-ciRYs5-jjzkxT-fp455D-2JrfTi-hy318h-5mZDc7-q61Z2D-dywyCa

    Data regarding the use of exercise to alleviate menopausal symptoms in midlife women have been somewhat mixed.  Although helpful in some women, moderate- to vigorous-intensity exercise may increase the risk of menopausal hot flashes.  A recent study suggests that light-intensity exercise, such as stretching may be helpful for menopausal symptoms.   Forty Japanese women were included ...

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  • Weekly Roundup for AUG 12 2016: Recent Publications in Women’s Mental Health

    August 12, 2016

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    Several of this week’s articles look at the impact of maternal depression on the child.  In the Journal of Pediatrics, Braungart-Rieker and colleagues explore how postpartum depression leads to parenting practices and behaviors which may make children more vulnerable to early onset obesity.  In another study, Norwegian researchers observe that maternal depression during pregnancy and ...

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  • Preliminary Study: Folic Acid Reduces Risk for Autism in Kids Prenatally Exposed to Antiepileptic Drugs

    August 10, 2016

    By Ragesoss - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=4544244

    Several studies have observed that fetal exposure to the antiepileptic drug (AED), valproic acid (Depakote), may significantly increase the risk of having a child with an autism spectrum disorder.  In contrast, exposures to other AEDs, including carbamazepine (Tegretol), oxcarbazepine (Trileptal), and lamotrigine (Lamictal), have not been associated with an increased risk of autism spectrum disorder ...

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  • Weekly Roundup for AUG 5 2016: Recent Publications in Women’s Mental Health

    August 6, 2016

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    This week brings another report from the SWAN study of midlife women indicating that menopausal symptoms are heterogeneous, with a significant proportion of women experiencing symptoms for many years.  There is also a very good review (Alpar et al) detailing the effects on children exposed prenatally to cannabis. Body image mediates the depressive effects of weight ...

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  • Depression and Hormonal Contraception: Should Depo-Provera Be Used in Postpartum Women?

    August 5, 2016

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    Because estrogen-containing contraceptives may affect lactation and may increase the risk of thrombosis, progestin-only contraceptives are used in women who are breastfeeding.  Depo-Provera (DMPA), which contains medroxyprogesterone, is frequently used during the immediate postpartum period in women who are breastfeeding and are interested in efficacious, long-term contraception.  (The minipill is another type of progestin-only contraceptive ...

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